How come?

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How come?

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Technic used: Digital printing
Gender: Unisex
Material:
-100% Combed Ring Spun Cotton (shrunk a bit at first wash)
-210g/m²
Made in: Marocco - Printed in Brussels
Edition: unlimited

Sebastien is wearing a Large size and he is 1m91.

This t-shirt fits big compared to standard chart.

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This is an interesting question, because the truth of the matter is that more artists are painting and making a living at art than ever before in human history. So part of the problem may be an overpopulation of artmakers.

The other side of the dilemma you clearly perceive is that the arts community has failed to educate the public about art, artmaking and what the economics of art really are. How in the world do you expect anyone in the general public to know what a work of art is worth? Just as a tiny example, Quora is absolutely littered with questions on this very topic.

You cannot expect people to understand value in an area as immense and complex as art when they have no education or background in the subject. You have to be the teacher, and if that makes you resentful, well then, don’t do it, and suffer the consequences.

This is absolutely no different than the steps that people in fashion, in the culinary field and many other areas have had to go through. They have had to educate their clientele over time in order for them to understand the subtleties and refinements of various products and the resulting pricing differences.

In art, most non-art people do not know the difference between prints and originals, between oil painting and acrylics - why a small work can cost as much as a large work, how pricing is established by an artist, why prices increase, etc. etc. etc. By and large, they know little to nothing. Well, if you know nothing and you are in a marketplace, you feel fearful, often resentful, and you surely do not feel generous. If these attitudes are going to change, it is up to the arts community to do it.

I have been selling (and making) art at all levels - from street shows to large galleries - from prices of $75 to over $150,000 for over forty years. I have sold art to high school students, priests, salespeople, professors, doctors, schoolteachers, lawyers, and the wealthy. Your premise is incorrect. People will pay for art. But they often need explanations before they will do so.

One of the things artists seem to resent is that people won’t just look at a painting, like it and pull out their checkbook or credit card, immediately. Sorry, but the world doesn’t work that way. People don’t act like that when they purchase anything except necessities, and even for those, they read the labels these days. A large part of being an artist today (and actually, always) is understanding your clients, working with them successfully, and doing the business part of art. Which means a lot of explaining and reassurance.

So stop resenting and learn how to do those things more successfully. Your sales will go up.

Thanks Guy, for the compliment of the A2A.




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